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Q&A Suggestion for allowing to mark answers as "accepted", "outdated" or "dangerous"

I kind of like the idea, especially for outdated/obsolete technology. But I'm concerned over how subjective a "dangerous" mark might end up. For example when it comes to programming, I work with sa...

posted 4y ago by Lundin‭

Answer
#1: Initial revision by user avatar Lundin‭ · 2020-09-08T07:12:45Z (almost 4 years ago)
I kind of like the idea, especially for outdated/obsolete technology. But I'm concerned over how subjective a "dangerous" mark might end up. 

For example when it comes to programming, I work with safety-critical embedded systems. The concerns I might have for what makes a program dangerous are not at all the same as someone working with network security programming. Not to mention the broad masses that program non-critical software.

So if I were to apply my quality standards on the average desktop program, I will come across as very pedantic. If a truck control system firmware divides by zero, it might cause physical harm to people, damage buildings or machinery etc. If a desktop program does the same, you get a little evil message box saying "bug", annoying but not dangerous.

Meaning that in order to label something dangerous, I would need to understand the end product, something that is very often not clear by the question. 

As for electronics, there's a strong trend that quacks or fresh graduates use hobbyist board computers like Arduino for commercial products. This is dangerous because that was never the intention of those boards - there are serious safety concerns both in terms of software and EMC. Are we to label everything tagged Arduino as dangerous then? Professional engineers will agree - hobbyists and students will get furious if we do.

One would need to give this some serious thought before implementing it.