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Q&A How can we improve community proposals?

posted almost 2 years ago by Moshi‭  ·  edited almost 2 years ago by Moshi‭

Answer
#2: Post edited by user avatar Moshi‭ · 2020-12-17T20:03:42Z (almost 2 years ago)
bolded the part I think is the most important, proposed solution
  • My 1 cent
  • > the point is that if supporters "register" somehow, then we know whom to contact and could do it with automation rather than hand-written comment pings.
  • This would essentially be solved by [being able to subscribe to a specific post](https://meta.codidact.com/posts/75060).
  • > I don't know if there is still a meaningful distinction between [idea] and [proposal].
  • There probably isn't, to be honest. The only difference was that one was "You should have a community of some interested users helping to build the site", but since we do the interest check regardless, it doesn't really matter.
  • > What else? What changes (in code or process) would help people proposing, supporting, and evaluating new communities on our network?
  • Honestly, the only thing that needs to change is activity - even though a proposal has 10 people saying they're interested, and maybe 3 experts, if none of them are actually working on the proposal itself (scope etc.) then it'll die.
  • I think part of it is how clunky comments are - they don't show as activity on the front page, so all the *real* discussion goes unnoticed and unanswered since nobody is gonna check back on a proposal if there's no "activity", right?
  • My three cents
  • > the point is that if supporters "register" somehow, then we know whom to contact and could do it with automation rather than hand-written comment pings.
  • This would essentially be solved by [being able to subscribe to a specific post](https://meta.codidact.com/posts/75060).
  • > I don't know if there is still a meaningful distinction between [idea] and [proposal].
  • There probably isn't, to be honest. The only difference was that one was "You should have a community of some interested users helping to build the site", but since we do the interest check regardless, it doesn't really matter.
  • > What else? What changes (in code or process) would help people proposing, supporting, and evaluating new communities on our network?
  • Honestly, **the only thing that needs to change is activity on the proposal** - even if a proposal has ten people saying they're interested, and maybe three experts, when none of them are actually working on the proposal itself (by discussing scope etc.) then it will die.
  • I think part of it is because of how clunky comments are - they don't show as activity on the front page, so all the *real* discussion goes unnoticed and unanswered since nobody is going to check back on a proposal if there's no "activity", right?
  • Perhaps we need to think about notifying users about comments - whether that be in general or just for subscribed users (when single-post subscriptions become a thing).
#1: Initial revision by user avatar Moshi‭ · 2020-12-17T05:46:07Z (almost 2 years ago)
My 1 cent

> the point is that if supporters "register" somehow, then we know whom to contact and could do it with automation rather than hand-written comment pings. 

This would essentially be solved by [being able to subscribe to a specific post](https://meta.codidact.com/posts/75060).

> I don't know if there is still a meaningful distinction between [idea] and [proposal].

There probably isn't, to be honest. The only difference was that one was "You should have a community of some interested users helping to build the site", but since we do the interest check regardless, it doesn't really matter.

> What else? What changes (in code or process) would help people proposing, supporting, and evaluating new communities on our network?

Honestly, the only thing that needs to change is activity - even though a proposal has 10 people saying they're interested, and maybe 3 experts, if none of them are actually working on the proposal itself (scope etc.) then it'll die.

I think part of it is how clunky comments are - they don't show as activity on the front page, so all the *real* discussion goes unnoticed and unanswered since nobody is gonna check back on a proposal if there's no "activity", right?