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Q&A

Welcome to Codidact Meta!

Codidact Meta is the meta-discussion site for the Codidact community network and the Codidact software. Whether you have bug reports or feature requests, support questions or rule discussions that touch the whole network – this is the site for you.

Comments on Can you post a question just to answer it yourself?

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Can you post a question just to answer it yourself?

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Does Codidact allow users to post questions and then immediately answer them?

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I haven’t seen anyone mention another reason to answer your own questions.

I wish I knew a more scientific or technical term for it, but it’s commonly called the Rubber Duck principle, and I utterly swear by it.

The idea that engaging in dialogue with interlocutors is profoundly beneficial to clarifying and developing one’s own thinking goes back to at least Socrates, yet is surely perennial wisdom.

Question-and-answer forums like Codidact give you the opportunity to externalize your questions to an audience - which allows you sometimes to make progress on them yourself. It’s sort of like a public declaration of a research to-do, or, throwing a ball up in the air, only to catch it yourself.

I personally believe I have learned more of intellectual worth, and grown more, having interlocutors - oftentimes, myself - on forums like Stack Exchange, than I did in university. I believe this strongly, in fact.

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But Codidact is not a forum. (4 comments)
But Codidact is not a forum.
Andreas from the dark caverns‭ wrote 2 months ago · edited 2 months ago

A forum implies discussion to be a goal. Sure, we discuss the site itself on Metas, that’s one of the goals, and why we even have a tag for it here, but that’s it. There’s a big difference between Q/A and forums. Our Q/As (excluding Metas), are supposed to be direct, fluff-free, and with no discussion. That’s the whole point of Q/A. Search for a question, and get the answer, no discussion stuck in your way. So posting Q/As to start a discussion, is an invalid use of the sites.

Maybe you as the post author wants a discussion, but nobody else does. People don’t visit Q/As for discussions, but for answers. That’s why we make them clear and isolated, and why we have strict rules, to maximise their usefulness to later visitors.

Julius H.‭ wrote 2 months ago

I agree completely with the vision. Out of curiosity, do you think the current design lends itself towards that goal?

For example: if a post is downvoted, if we take that as an indicator that the community does not find it accords with the content principles of Codidact, is it sufficiently clear what needs to be changed? Do you think this acts as a sort of "checklist" to determine if a question is good or not, or do we need more information for users as to exactly what they should do in order to improve downvoted posts?

trichoplax‭ wrote 2 months ago

In an idealised world, where the experts always give perfect answers that need no improvement, a Q&A site would be entirely distinct from a forum. In the messy real world, where even experts make mistakes, our Q&A site has comment threads for discussion of how questions and answers can be improved.

Although discussion is not the purpose of Codidact, it is an important part of achieving the goal of clear, concise answers to questions.