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Perhaps with some edit or conceptual change the question would be a good fit for scientific speculation?

Daily life computerized automation as impacting the number of marriages and live births

I understand that dating is quite of a new phenomenon and it was rare to nonexistent before the 19th century; marriages were typically a way to share resources between families to ensure survival and prosperity and was most often based on matchmaking rather than on anything we would name "dating" today.

In modern era marriages define mutual residence and having children with the common and challenged view that men should bring all or most salary and women should bring little to no salary and either way, mainly do housekeeping tasks.

Is there a theory according to which computerized automation (i.e. applications and robots), applied in daily life, somewhat decrease, or actually increase, the amount of family arrangements and live births?

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2 comment threads

That would fall under "Sociology"... (3 comments)
I don't think the real question is about "automation". This is a classic question, examined in many p... (1 comment)

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